Green Smart Grid Initiative

They Said It

 

President Barack Obama...

“[T]he nation that leads in the creation of a clean energy economy will be the nation that leads the 21st century global economy.”
President Barack Obama, “Weekly Address: President Obama Calls Energy Bill Passage Critical to Stronger American Economy” June 27, 2009, view source website »

“We’ll fund a better, smarter electricity grid and train workers to build it – a grid that will help us ship wind and solar power from one end of this country to another. Think about it. The grid that powers the tools of modern life – computers, appliances, even blackberries – looks largely the same as it did half a century ago. Just these first steps toward modernizing the way we distribute electricity could reduce consumption by 2 to 4 percent.”
President Barack Obama, “Remarks of President Barack Obama: Promoting the Recovery Plan with Secretary Chu”, February 5, 2009, view source website »

 

U.S. Energy Secretary Dr. Steven Chu...

“To meet the energy challenge and create a 21st century energy economy, we need a 21st century electric grid.”
U.S. Energy Secretary Dr. Steven Chu, “Investing in Our Energy Future,” September 2009, view source website »

“Energy Storage is critical to grid operations.”
U.S. Energy Secretary Dr. Steven Chu, “Investing in Our Energy Future,” September 2009, view source website »

 

Jon Wellinghoff, Chairman, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC)...

“And it turns out that demand response, local storage, and distributed generation are among the best ‘dance partners’ to ensure we can reliably integrate renewable energy resources into the grid.”
Jon Wellinghoff, Chairman, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), “Remarks of FERC Chairman Jon Wellinghoff CAISO Stakeholder Symposium October 7, 2009,” 10/7/09 view source website

Cutting demand by a few minutes or seconds also could let the U.S. grid cheaply incorporate renewable sources like wind and solar that otherwise would need backup from plants that stayed idle most of the time.
FERC Chairman Jon Wellinghoff, cited by Reuters, “Smart Grid Good for Big Solar, Wind: US Regulator,” October 2009
view source website »

 

U.S. Department of Energy...

“The vision of the smart grid R&D program is that: By 2030, the power grid has evolved into an intelligent energy delivery system that supports plug-and-play integration of dispatchable and intermittent low-carbon energy sources, and provides a platform for consumer engagement in load management, national energy independence, innovation, entrepreneurship, and economic security. This smart grid supports the best and most secure electric services available in the world and connects everyone to abundant, affordable, high quality, environmentally conscious, efficient, and reliable electric power.”
U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability. “Smart Grid Research and Development Multi-Year Program Plan”, September 2012, view source website »

“To get a greener grid, you need a Smart Grid. Solar and wind power are necessary and desirable components of a cleaner energy future. To make the grid run cleaner, it will take a grid capable of dealing with the variable nature of these renewable resources.”
U.S. Department of Energy, “The Smart Grid: An Introduction,” 2008 view source website »

“Smart Grid technologies will allow the grid to better adapt to the dynamics of renewable energy and distributed generation, helping utilities and consumers more easily access these resources and reap the benefits.”
U.S. Department of Energy Electricity Advisory Committee, “Smart Grid: Enabler of the New Energy Economy,” December 2008 view source website »

“[Smart Grid-enabled] renewable energy resources are not only environmentally friendly; they create cost-saving opportunities for consumers who are able to generate electricity in excess of their own needs and sell the surplus back to the grid.”
U.S. Department of Energy Electricity Advisory Committee, “Smart Grid: Enabler of the New Energy Economy,” December 2008, view source website »

“Smart Homes and Smart Buildings are convenient, efficient, and can encourage consumers to make energy-efficient decisions that result in energy savings.”
U
.S. Department of Energy Electricity Advisory Committee, “Smart Grid: Enabler of the New Energy Economy,” December 2008, view source website »

“One of the most appealing benefits of deploying a Smart Grid is that the ‘smart’ technologies can be used to shift or control demand to reduce peaks.”
U.S. Department of Energy Electricity Advisory Committee, “Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability and Capacity Concerns in the Modern Grid,” December 2008, view source website »

“One area in which energy storage technologies could provide great benefits is in conjunction with renewable energy resources. By storing energy from variable resources such as wind and solar power, energy storage could provide firm generation from these units, allow the energy produced to be used more efficiently.”
U.S. Department of Energy Electricity Advisory Committee, “Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability and Capacity Concerns in the Modern Grid,” December 2008 view source website »

 

North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC)...

“The Smart Grid empowers consumers to control their own carbon footprints.”  
North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC), “Electric Industry Concerns on the Reliability Impacts of Climate Change Initiatives," November 2008, view source website »

"Demand response [is] a 'dance partner' for variable renewable generation, such as wind power.  Demand response can ... manage the down 'ramps' that occur in wind plant output."   
Rick Sergel, President and CEO North American Electric Reliability Corporation, Executive Remarks to the Energy Future Coalition Working Group, November 21, 2008

“Further, Smart Grid may facilitate the integration of renewable resources, reduce energy use, deploy Demand Response, and reduce greenhouse gases.”
NERC, “2009 Long-Term Reliability Assessment,” October 2009, view source website »

 

The New York Times...

“The dirty secret of clean energy is that while generating it is getting easier, moving it to market is not.”
New York Times, “Wind Energy Bumps into Power Grid’s Limits,” August 2008 view source website »

“The smart grid effort is about finding ways to change the electricity grid so that utilities can help reduce peoples' juice-guzzling habits.”
New York Times, “Largest 'Smart Grid' Test Hopes to Shock Consumers about Energy Use,” October 2009 view source website »

“Yet experts say that without a solution to the grid problem, effective use of wind power on a wide scale is likely to remain a dream.”
New York Times, “Wind Energy Bumps Into Power Grid’s Limits,” August 2008, view source website »

“‘We still have a third-world grid,” Mr. [Bill] Richardson [Governor of New Mexico] said, ‘With the federal government not investing, not setting good regulatory mechanisms, and basically taking a back seat on everything except drilling and fossil fuels, the grid has not been modernized, especially for wind energy.’”
New York Times, “Wind Energy Bumps Into Power Grid’s Limits,” August 2008, view source website »

 

California Independent System Operator (CAISO)...

“Demand response will be a powerful tool for meeting the environmental challenges ahead.”
California Independent System Operator (CAISO), “eGrid Technologies Help Achieve Environmental Goals,” December 2007, view source website »

“Pairing another environmentally friendly resource—demand response—with renewable power will help the [California] ISO maintain grid reliability.  Demand reduction is just as effective, and often less expensive, than adding megawatts onto the grid and it doesn’t add a single pollutant.”
California Independent System Operator (CAISO), “eGrid Technologies Help Achieve Environmental Goals,” December 2007, view source website »

“Demand response will be a powerful tool for meeting the environmental challenges ahead.  It is not necessarily about using less electricity, but rather using it in a smart way. The demand response laboratory demonstrates ‘set and forget’ automation technology that helps consumers, large and small, make predefined changes to their electricity usage that will reduce the strain on the grid, while reducing the strain on costs.”
California Independent System Operator (CAISO), “eGrid Technologies Help Achieve Environmental Goals,” December 2007, view source website »

 

Other Notable Quotes...

“The smart grid can give us cleaner air, better health, lower electricity bills, and reduced carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in the atmosphere.”
Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), “The Promise of the Smart Grid: Goals, Policies, and Measurement Must Support Sustainability Benefits”, October 2012, view source website »

"Electricity supply and demand can be balanced in every hour of the year in each region with nearly 80% electricity from renewable resources, including nearly 50% from variable renewable generation, according to simulations of 2050 power system operations."
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, “Renewable Electricity Futures Study”, June 2012, view source website »

“…smart behaviors, smart choices, and smart planning should be thought of as an essential resource for achieving energy and climate goals."
ACEEE (American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy), "Behavior, Energy, and Climate Change: Policy Directions, Program Innovations, and Research Paths," November 2008 view source website »

“Reducing carbon emissions and controlling energy demand requires upgraded and smarter electricity grids in Europe and energy efficiency measures.”
Lord Mogg (non-executive) Chairman of Ofgem, Chairman of the European Regulators Group for Electricity and Gas (ERGEG), and President of the Council of European Energy Regulators (CEER), “World Energy Regulators Commit to Eight Concrete Actions to Help Meet the Climate Change Challenge,” October 2009, view source website

“Investments in grids need to be carried out to introduce intelligent technologies that will benefit consumers and also help to reach GHG reduction targets.”
International Confederation of Energy Regulators, “World Energy Regulators’ Statement on Climate Change,” October 2009 view source website »

“Utilities will not be able to meet Renewable Portfolio Standards without a smart grid.”
Global Environment Fund and Global Smart Energy, “The Electricity Economy: New Opportunities from the Transformation of the Electric Power Sector,” August 2008
view source website »


All over the world, policymakers and utilities are waking up to the fact that they cannot connect, ship and control the green power they want without a modern, intelligent grid.”
Global Environment Fund and Global Smart Energy, “The Electricity Economy: New Opportunities from the Transformation of the Electric Power Sector,” August 2008, view source website »

 


If the electrical grid were 5% more efficient it could displace the equivalent of 42 coal-fired power plants.
Jon Wellinghoff, Commissioner, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), testimony before the Subcommittee on Energy and Air Quality, US House of Representatives, May 2007

Smart Grid technologies can help families save 10% on their power bills.
Pacific Northwest National Laboratories, "Pacific Northwest GridWise Testbed Demonstration Projects," October 2007

Cutting demand by a few minutes or seconds also could let the U.S. grid cheaply incorporate renewable sources like wind and solar that otherwise would need backup from plants that stayed idle most of the time.
FERC Chairman Jon Wellinghoff, cited by Reuters, "Smart Grid Good for Big Solar, Wind: US Regulator" October 2009

"Integrating wind or solar power into the grid at scale - at levels higher than 20% - will require advanced energy management techniques and approaches at the grid operator level. The Smart Gridís ability to dynamically manage all sources of power on the grid means that more distributed generation can be integrated within it."
U.S. Department of Energy, "The Smart Grid: An Introduction," 2008

The Smart Grid helps reduce emissions by managing electricity peak load. CO2 emissions on peak can be 230% higher than off peak.
San Diego Gas & Electric and Southern California Gas Company, "Proposed Energy Efficiency Risk- Reward Incentive Mechanism and E M&V Activities" (comments filed with the Public Utilities Commission of California, Docket R0901019), May 2009

The Green Smart Grid Initiative
GSGI is supported by the Association for Demand Response and Smart Grid (ADS) and the Demand Response and Smart Grid Coalition (DRSG). 
__________
1301 Connecticut Avenue NW, Suite 350, Washington, DC 20036
info@greensmartgridinitiative.org 
202.296.1686

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